One person badly burned by fire in Modesto, officials say

NORTHERN UPLANDS. LSGUTA ANDREA: THE GRASS FIRE IN MODESTO IS CONTAINED TONIGHT AFTER BURNING 53 ACRES. ONE PERSON WAS SERIOUSLY INJURED THIS AFTERNOON BY A WIND STARTED FIRE NEAR MODESTO AIRPORT. THIS FIRE STARTED ON FINCH AND MARIPOSA ROADS, IT BURNED TO THE TUOLUMNE RIVER

One person badly burned by wind-driven fire in Modesto, officials say

One person was seriously injured Monday afternoon by a wind-driven fire near the Modesto airport, officials said. A fire broke out on Finch and Mariposa roads along the Tuolumne River and burned 53 acres, the Modesto Fire Department said. The fire, which may have been a cooking fire, started in an illegal encampment along the river. The person injured in the blaze has been sent to hospital, firefighters said. It is believed that this burn victim was a homeless person who lived in the area. At 5:08 p.m., crews told KCRA 3 they had the fire under control and were now clearing up, a process fire crews do to ensure hot spots do not. with containment lines, crews build natural or man-made barriers around the perimeter of a fire to keep flames from spreading, but there have been instances in recent years where extreme wildfire behavior can spread beyond a containment line. Related ContentContainment: What It Means and Its Impact on Stopping WildfiresCalifornia Wildfire 2022 Preparedness Guide: What to Know and How to Stay SafeThis is a developing story. Stick with KCRA 3 for the latest.

One person was seriously injured Monday afternoon by a wind-driven fire near the Modesto airport, officials said.

A fire broke out on Finch and Mariposa roads along the Tuolumne River and burned 53 acres, the Modesto Fire Department said. The fire, which may have been a cooking fire, started in an illegal encampment along the river.

The person injured in the blaze was taken to hospital, firefighters said. It is believed that this burnt victim was a homeless person who lived in the area.

At 5:08 p.m., crews told KCRA 3 they had the blaze under control and were now cleaning up, a process fire crews use to ensure hot spots don’t ignite and do not rekindle the flames.

With containment lines, crews build natural or man-made barriers around the perimeter of a fire to keep flames from spreading, but there have been instances in recent years where extreme wildfire behavior can spread beyond a containment line.

Related content

Containment: what it means and its impact on stopping wildfires

California Wildfire 2022 Preparedness Guide: What to Know and How to Stay Safe

This is a developing story. Stick with KCRA 3 for the latest.

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