Make-A-Wish Foundation study shows impact of wishes on children and their families

The Make-A-Wish Foundation conducted a study that defined for the first time the impact of wishes on children and their families. The foundation’s research has shown that the wish experience contributes significantly to physical, mental and emotional health. Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 spoke exclusively to healthcare professionals who know the value of Make-A-Wish firsthand. Watch the full story in the video player above. You can probably think of the most popular Make-A-Wish destination. “I was 8 when I got cancer, and I was 9, I did the Make-A-Wish trip when I was 9,” said Luke Carlson, a medical student from pitt. Carlson went to Disney World. “I mean, it was my first time to Disney World in my life. And so, especially at 9 years old, it was a really good time to go, fresh out of treatment for the cancer,” Carlson said. . In the fall, he entered medical school at the University of Pittsburgh. Professors there, some of his own doctors, wanted to quantify the impact of Make-A-Wish. only for the actual wish, but for the rest of their lives,” said Dr. Jean Marie Tersak, professor of pediatric oncology at UPMC Children’s Hospital. Dr. Kurt Weiss is a professor of oncology at the University of Pittsburgh. When he was 15, he got bone cancer. Now he is a bone cancer doctor and a professor. “I had a very strange wish, my wish was to get a new tenor saxophone and play it with the Notre Dame band at whatever bowling game they were going to this New Year,” Weiss said. Weiss said he had a hunch about Make-A-Wish’s impact long after the wish ended. Tersak said childhood cancers have an overall cure rate of 85%. “So sometimes we see patients who are 20 years or older post-wish and honestly they’re still talking about it,” Tersak said. Weiss spoke of the hope his wish gave him. “Where the wish really helped and touched me was in the difficult days ahead that I could look back on the wish and remember how wonderful it was and if I had survived my cancer and I was still doing well in schools, maybe I could go to Notre Dame,” Weiss said. The new study of 3,000 dream parents, hundreds of children and 42 doctors confirms his hunch. Make-A-Wish is a necessary part of the medical treatment journey, improves chances of survival, provides a support system and better health outcomes, and gives the child a better chance of recovering from critical illness. “But it’s really all the things that happen after that, the hope and the joy and the resilience that comes from wishing that is also magical,” Weiss said. Weiss ended up playing in the Notre Dame Marching Band and was the band’s president when he went to college there. Make-A-Wish Greater Pennsylvania and West Virginia is headquartered in Pittsburgh. To date, nearly 20,000 wishes have been granted, which is more than any other chapter in the world.

The Make-A-Wish Foundation conducted a study that defined for the first time the impact of wishes on children and their families.

The foundation’s research has shown that the wish experience contributes significantly to physical, mental and emotional health.

Pittsburgh’s Action News 4 spoke exclusively to healthcare professionals who know the value of Make-A-Wish firsthand.

Watch the full story in the video player above.

You can probably think of the most popular Make-A-Wish destination.

“I was 8 when I got cancer, and I was 9, I did the Make-A-Wish trip when I was 9,” said Luke Carlson, a medical student from pitt.

Carlson went to Disney World.

“I mean, it was my first time to Disney World in my life. And so, especially at 9 years old, it was a really good time to go, fresh out of treatment for the cancer,” Carlson said. .

In the fall, he entered medical school at the University of Pittsburgh. Professors there, including some of his own doctors, wanted to quantify the impact of Make-A-Wish.

“There was a large study interviewing many thousands of children, parents, medical providers, to document very clearly that this wish makes a big difference not just to the actual wish, but to the rest of their lives” said Dr. Jean Marie Tersak, professor of pediatric oncology at UPMC Children’s Hospital.

Dr. Kurt Weiss is a professor of oncology at the University of Pittsburgh. When he was 15, he got bone cancer. Now he is a bone cancer doctor and a professor.

“I had a very strange wish, my wish was to get a new tenor saxophone and play it with the Notre Dame band at whatever bowling game they were going to this New Year,” Weiss said.

Weiss said he had a hunch about Make-A-Wish’s impact long after the wish ended.

Tersak said childhood cancers have an overall cure rate of 85%.

“So sometimes we see patients who are 20 years or older post-wish and honestly they’re still talking about it,” Tersak said.

Weiss spoke of the hope his wish gave him.

“Where the wish really helped and touched me was in the difficult days ahead that I could look back on the wish and remember how wonderful it was and if I had survived my cancer and I was still doing well in schools, maybe I could go to Notre Dame,” Weiss said.

The new study of 3,000 dream parents, hundreds of children and 42 doctors confirms his hunch.

Make-A-Wish is a necessary part of the medical treatment journey, improves chances of survival, provides a support system and better health outcomes, and gives the child a better chance of recovering from critical illness.

“But it’s really all the things that happen after that, the hope and the joy and the resilience that comes from wishing that is also magical,” Weiss said.

Weiss ended up playing in the Notre Dame Marching Band and was the band’s president when he went to college there.

Make-A-Wish Greater Pennsylvania and West Virginia is headquartered in Pittsburgh.

To date, nearly 20,000 wishes have been granted, which is more than any other chapter in the world.

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