Gate control system failed in Boston man’s death on red line

According to a preliminary report, the National Transportation Safety Board said a door control system on a Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Red Line train malfunctioned in connection with the death of a man. Boston.Robinson Lalin, 39, of Boston, died April December 10, he caught his arm in the doorway of an incoming Red Line train at the Broadway platform at around 12:30 p.m. was dragged, sustaining fatal injuries. According to the NTSB’s preliminary report, Lalin attempted to exit the six-car train through the car’s side passenger door as the train doors were closing and his right arm became caught in the doorway. The train then left the station, dragging Lalin along the platform for about 105 feet and onto the surface below, near the tracks. The NTSB said MBTA trains are designed and equipped with safety features to prevent them from moving when the passenger doors are obstructed. The preliminary report states that after examining and testing the Red Line train involved, NTSB investigators were able to identify a fault in a local door control system that allowed the train to move with the door obstructed. In a statement on the NTSB’s preliminary report, the MBTA said its own investigators determined that Lalin boarded a northbound Red Line train at Fields Corner station after midnight. According to the MBTA, the NTSB confirmed its initial assessment of a short in the car’s wiring that allowed the train to start moving as Lalin attempted to exit through the closing doors. preliminary report and expresses its appreciation for the NTSB’s diligent work on the circumstances surrounding the April 10 tragic death of Robinson Lalin at Broadway Station,” the MBTA statement read. “The MBTA wishes to once again express its deepest sincere condolences to the Lalin family regarding this heartbreaking incident.” Lalin’s family members told NewsCenter 5 that he is a father of two and grew up in Boston MBTA. “I want to hear from the MBTA. They apologized at a board meeting, but that’s not enough. You didn’t call me. You haven’t spoken to my mother or my grandmother,” Kelvin Lalin, Robinson, told Laline’s nephew. “We deserve an apology. We deserve something from the MBTA. They’re responsible for it.” in other trains. The MBTA said no other similar circuit faults were found in other Red Line cars of the same make and model during rigorous testing. In addition of regular preventative maintenance, the MBTA said its staff is supplementing existing door inspection protocols with testing to prevent this issue from recurring.The NTSB said its investigation is continuing and that while investigators were at the scene, they had examined and tested training equipment, reviewed security footage, observed MBTA train operations, conducted interviews, and conducted sight-distance observations. The 5 Investigates team has learned that the operator of the Red Line train involved in the death of Robinson Lalin remains off duty while the investigation continues.Sources have previously told 5 Investigates that the train operator is a woman from Boston who has worked for the MBTA since 2018. MBTA train operators are responsible for looking out the window, checking a monitor and looking in a large mirror to check that the doors are clear before departure from the station.

The National Transportation Safety Board says a door control system on a Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority Red Line train malfunctioned in connection with the death of a Boston man, according to a preliminary report .

Robinson Lalin, 39, of Boston, died on April 10 when he caught his arm in the doorway of an incoming Red Line train at the Broadway platform around 12:30 p.m. and was dragged, sustaining fatal injuries.

According to the NTSB’s preliminary report, Lalin attempted to exit the six-car train through the car’s side passenger door as the train doors closed and his right arm became trapped in the doorway. The train then left the station, dragging Lalin along the platform for about 105 feet and onto the surface below, near the tracks.

The NTSB said MBTA trains are designed and equipped with safety features to prevent them from moving when passenger doors are obstructed. The preliminary report states that after examining and testing the Red Line train involved, NTSB investigators were able to identify a fault in a local door control system that allowed the train to move with the door obstructed.

In a statement on the NTSB’s preliminary report, the MBTA said its own investigators determined that Lalin boarded a northbound Red Line train at Fields Corner station after midnight. According to the MBTA, the NTSB confirmed its initial assessment of a short in the car’s wiring that allowed the train to start moving as Lalin attempted to exit through the closing doors.

“The MBTA acknowledges the release of the National Transportation Safety Board’s preliminary report and expresses its appreciation for the NTSB’s diligent work on the circumstances surrounding the tragic death of Robinson Lalin on April 10 at Broadway Station,” the MBTA statement read. “The MBTA once again wishes to express its deepest condolences to the Lalin family regarding this heartbreaking incident.”

Lalin’s family members told NewsCenter 5 that he was a father of two and grew up in Boston and was a frequent MBTA runner.

“I want to hear from the MBTA. They apologized at a board meeting, but that’s not enough. You didn’t call me. You didn’t speak to my mom or my grandmother,” said Kelvin Lalin, Robinson Lalin’s nephew. . “We deserve an apology. We deserve something from the MBTA. They are responsible for it.”

The MBTA and NTSB both said the local transit authority immediately began an inspection of Red Line’s fleet to look for the specific gate control system fault in other trains. The MBTA said no other similar circuit faults were found in any of the other Red Line cars of the same make and model during rigorous testing.

In addition to regular preventative maintenance, the MBTA said its staff is supplementing existing door inspection protocols with additional testing to prevent this issue from recurring.

The NTSB said its investigation is continuing and while investigators were at the scene, they examined and tested training equipment, reviewed security footage, observed MBTA train operations, conducted interviews and conducted sighting distance observations.

According to the agency, future NTSB investigation activity will focus on the MBTA’s passenger load management equipment and operating procedures.

The 5 Investigates team has learned that the operator of the Red Line train involved in the death of Robinson Lalin remains off duty as the investigation continues. Sources previously told 5 Investigates that the train operator is a woman from Boston who has worked for the MBTA since 2018.

MBTA train operators are instructed to look out the window, check a monitor, and look in a large mirror to check that the doors are clear before leaving the station.

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