Death of NH police academy rookie highlights mental health

The death of a New Hampshire police academy recruit on the second day of classes is the subject of a full-scale investigation. The Director of Police Standards and Training announced the untimely death after the man’s body was found in his vehicle around 2.45pm on Tuesday. In the statement, the Police Standards and Training Board called the death shock, premature and tragic. But officials close to the case said the cause of death must be revealed by the medical examiner before they can comment specifically on what happened. “People are in shock,” Bow Police Chief Ken Miller said. “It came out of left field. No one expected something like this.” The Bow Police Department had hired the recruit, who was in his second day of training. “He was a great boy,” Miller said. “He’s been working here since June 13. Always on time, great attitude, always smiling – just a really good lad. It took us all by surprise.” Franklin Police Chief David Goldstein said he prioritizes the mental health of first responders. in New Hampshire since the 1970s and was at the Concord Police Academy on Tuesday morning, teaching a four-hour course on managing workplace stress and available resources. He had just left the academy when he got the call to return, and the state’s Critical Incident Response Team was activated. “We’re looking at who’s most affected from the start,” Goldstein said. “We try to find that person or that small group and assure them that we are here to help.” At Bow, critical incident training is part of staff development. “We’re trying to create an internal peer support team that has all this training that an officer can go through if needed,” Miller said.

The death of a New Hampshire police academy recruit on the second day of classes is the subject of a full-scale investigation.

The Director of Police Standards and Training announced the untimely death after the man’s body was found in his vehicle around 2.45pm on Tuesday.

In the statement, the Police Standards and Training Board called the death shock, premature and tragic. But officials close to the case said the cause of death must be revealed by the medical examiner before they can comment specifically on what happened.

“People are in shock,” Bow Police Chief Ken Miller said. “It came out of left field. No one expected something like this.”

The Bow Police Department had hired the recruit, who was in his second day of training.

“He was a great boy,” Miller said. “He’s been working here since June 13. Always on time, great attitude, always smiling – just a really good lad. It took us all by surprise.”

Franklin Police Chief David Goldstein said he has prioritized the mental health of first responders in New Hampshire since the 1970s and was at the Concord Police Academy on Tuesday morning to teach a four-hour course on managing workplace stress and the resources that are available.

He had just left the academy when he got the call to go back, and the state’s Critical Incident Response Team was activated.

“We’re looking at who’s most affected from the start,” Goldstein said. “We try to find that individual or that small group and assure them that we are here to help.”

At Bow, critical incident training is part of staff development.

“We’re trying to build an internal peer support team that has all this training that an agent can go through if needed,” Miller said.

Confidential help is available 24/7 for anyone in crisis by calling or texting 988.

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