A man is cycling across the country to raise awareness about mental health

After learning that his loved one had died by suicide, Richard Lima decided to take his bike to the East Coast and travel the country to raise awareness about mental health and suicide prevention. it doesn’t matter everyone has a tie,” Lima said Saturday morning. After beginning his trek in North Carolina on June 4, Lima traveled to Folsom on Saturday; saying it was a major goal for him to drive through the greater Sacramento area because his loved one had called the Valley home. .Lima, riding for Never Ride Alone, connects with local mental health advocates and suicide prevention groups across the country.In Sacramento, Lima connected with JJ’s Hello Foundation, a group has started in honor of Joshua Anderson Jr., a 12-year-old killed himself in 2016. “Even when your kids are doing well, open up those conversations because that way when they’re not doing well, they know they have someone one to turn to in you,” said Josh Anderson, JJ’s father. The Anderson family told KCRA 3 that they hope to help families start an open dialogue for families in the Sacramento area. “Everyone says we shouldn’t talk about it because you know we’re going to put it in their head, well I didn’t talk about it, and my son isn’t here,” said Michelle Anderson, the mother of JJ.M ichelle explained that during her youth she had a suicide attempt in which she survived, she never told her children about it, and now she wishes she would. I wasn’t there… I wish I had told him what I was up to then, I’m not saying he would be there if I had, but it would have opened my eyes. eyes and made me see what my son was going through,” said Michelle Anderson. Anderson’s foundation, JJ’s Hello Foundation, believes that a simple “hello” to a stranger can save a life. also explained that they stray away from the word “commit” when discussing the act of suicide, as “commit” has a negative connotation.As for Lima and his journey through the country, he plans to complete his journey of more than 4,000 miles. on the Santa Monica Pier in the coming weeks. Mental health and suicide prevention resources are available locally and nationally. -741Crisis Chat Learn more hereI’m Alive (Online Crisis Chat) Learn more hereLGBTQ Specific HelplineThe Trevor Project – 1-866-488-7386Local Resources in Sacramento CASuicide Prevention Hotline (Wellspace) 916-368-3111 | LEARN MORE | Here is a list of mental health resources in Northern California.

After learning that his loved one had died by suicide, Richard Lima decided to take his bike to the East Coast and travel the country to raise awareness about mental health and suicide prevention.

“It’s prevalent across the country everywhere I go, small town, big city, whatever everyone has a tie,” Lima said Saturday morning.

After beginning his trek in North Carolina on June 4, Lima traveled to Folsom on Saturday; saying it was a major goal for him to drive through the greater Sacramento area because his loved one made the valley his home.

“I had no idea about mental illness or suicide, until I lost a loved one to suicide and made this journey,” Lima said.

Lima, who rides for Never Ride Alone, is in contact with local mental health advocates and suicide prevention groups across the country.

In Sacramento, Lima connected with JJ’s Hello Foundation, a group created in honor of Joshua Anderson Jr., a 12-year-old who died by suicide in 2016.

“Even when your kids are doing well, open up those conversations because that way when they’re not doing well, they know they have someone in you to talk to,” said Josh Anderson, JJ’s father.

The Anderson family told KCRA 3 that they hope to help families start an open dialogue for families in the Sacramento area.

“Everyone says we shouldn’t talk about it because you know we’re going to put it in their head, well I haven’t talked about it, and my son isn’t here,” Michelle Anderson said, JJ’s mother.

Michelle explained that during her youth she made a suicide attempt which she survived, she never told her children about it, and now she wishes she had.

“There were many times where I would sit and think maybe I’d be better off if I wasn’t there… I wish I had told him, what I dealt with then, I’m not saying that he would be here if I had, but it would have opened my eyes and made me see what my son was going through,” Michelle Anderson said.

The Anderson Foundation, JJ’s Hello Foundation, believes that a simple “hello” to a stranger can save a life. The Andersons also explained that they steer clear of the word “commit” when discussing the act of suicide, as “commit” has a negative connotation.

As for Lima and his trip across the country, he plans to complete his 4,000+ mile journey on the Santa Monica Pier in the coming weeks.

Mental health and suicide prevention resources are available locally and nationally.

  • 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Crisis Line
    • Call 1-800-273-TALK (8255) or text “Hello” to 741-741
  • I’m alive (online crisis chat)
  • LGBTQ Specific Helpline
    • The Trevor Project – 1-866-488-7386
  • Local Resources in Sacramento California
    • Suicide Prevention Hotline (Wellspace) 916-368-3111

| LEARN MORE | Here is a list of mental health resources in Northern California

Video player below: UC Davis Health psychiatrist shares mental health self-monitoring tips


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